Canadian Family Pharmacy Breaks Down Generic Viagra Price

In all the developed countries, the demand for care, and thus health expenditure, after a period of growth lower than the gross domestic product due to restrictive control measures, is increasing faster than the economy that supports them. A difference of 1.5 to 2 points of GDP is allowed. Health insurance systems, whether public or private, are struggling to balance their revenues, which cannot reasonably increase more than the GDP of each of the countries concerned, and their expenditure, which increases mechanically because of the lengthening of the duration of life, transition to the chronicity of affections there is little more often quickly mortal and progress of the diagnostic and therapeutic means, sources of obvious well-being but also of additional expenses.

Canadian Family Pharmacy Breaks Down Generic Viagra Price

Depending on the country, the reimbursement of pharmaceutical care represents between 15 and 20% of the expenditure of health insurance systems and is often the first budget item after reimbursements related to hospital stays. The increase in this budget item is often denounced as being the main cause of the chronic deficit of the health insurance systems.

Generic drugs and their price explained

In an attempt to limit or even eliminate this deficit, regulators in all the states concerned have implemented measures that differ little from one country to another. In order to be able to pay for the innovative and expensive medicines needed by certain patients in a fair way, they have proposed to lower the cost for health insurance – and the possible additional payers – of the most common, widely distributed and used treatments. This means that the cost of their development has been largely amortized and their cost price has significantly decreased due to economies of scale and experience. As the patent which guarantees the exclusivity of exploitation in the laboratory at the origin of the placing on the market expires after ten years of actual commercialization, other manufacturers can then propose to the registration their version, called ‘generic’, of these proven drugs.

Not having to realize the very heavy clinical development required of the innovating drug, nor the effort of information and pedagogy necessary to familiarize the doctors with the prescription and the good use of a new molecule or a new therapeutic scheme these generic drugs have a cost price – including depreciation – significantly lower than that of their reference version. This price decrease is not accompanied by any counterpart in terms of the quality, effectiveness and safety of these generic drugs compared to their originator. The quality and safety granted to each generic by the authorities in charge of the registration of medicines is the guarantee.

The acceleration of the calendar of expiry dates of drug patents very significantly present in the prescription over the next five to six years should lead to being able to satisfy nearly 85% of the needs of prescribers and patients with drugs that have become ‘generic’ And, therefore, potentially ‘generics’.

How much can be saved with generic drugs like Viagra?

How much can be saved with generic drugs like ViagraAs mentioned above, the problem of increasing pharmaceutical expenditure is common to all developed countries. Equally widespread is the use of the generic drug as a means of containing the envelope of these expenses within tolerable limits, while guaranteeing equitable access to care for all. The economy achieved through generics makes it possible for payers – public or private health insurance funds depending on countries and systems – to finance the use of the most innovative and expensive treatments that some patients need.

With regard to the penetration of generics, that is to say from their part in the general pharmaceutical market, there is however a disparity between countries, especially in Europe. This disparity is particularly marked even if one analyzes only the market of medicines whose patent has expired and which are therefore ‘generic’. The share of this segment actually delivered to the public in the form of generic varies from just over 30% to more than 90%.

It should be noted in passing that the market share attributed to generics in this segment ‘patent expire’ was evaluated in 2007 to nearly 50%. In these circumstances, the performance of generic versions must be emphasized, especially since the law leaves the insured social patient free to accept or not the substitution proposed by the pharmacist.

Another essential point to consider is the market share of generics in the global pharmaceutical market. In 2008, generics accounted for 21.9% of the market for volume-reimbursable medicines (units), which means that nearly one out of every five medicines dispensed in a pharmacy was a When a patient comes to the counter of a pharmacy with a prescription containing a specialty – brand or generic – registered in the directory, the pharmacist provides a generic three times out of four. This is both a great deal, reflecting a substitution effort and therefore a sustained generic dispensation by pharmacists, and few, given the figures observed in some other countries.

The reason is that the prescription continues to ‘slip’ tried drugs, likely to be proposed in a generic version, to drugs still under patent, so not yet ‘generic’. This slippage of prescription can be explained in some cases by the obsolescence of molecules reaching the end of their ‘patent’ period. Therapeutic progress, since it is medically significant, cannot be rejected by the prescriber, whom his ethics requires to treat ‘in accordance with the acquired data of science’ and which therefore cannot base his prescription on the criterion first cost treatment.

But in most cases, it is observed that the prescription of drugs that are no longer under patent falls due to the cessation of any promotional support, any informative recall, from the laboratory until then in exclusivity, as it can be observed in case of generic Viagra after the patent for this drug has expired in several countries. What use would it be to remind the doctor of the interest of prescribing such a drug if, at the pharmacy, it is a generic version, marketed by another manufacturer, which is dispensed? Naturally, laboratories offering drugs still protected in the same indication, or even in the same class, seize the opportunity and try to occupy the ground thus left vacant. These firms are undoubtedly in the logic imposed on them by the relative brevity of the life cycle of any pharmaceutical product and their corporate duty as an economic actor. But it is clear that this displacement of the prescription is on the one hand devoid in most cases of any serious medical justification and on the other hand ‘politically incorrect’ in the sense that it counteracts a policy of access to care that is wants fair in a closed envelope system.